Bimstore Bible Standards

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Bimstore believe that it's important that every piece of content on Bimstore is created to the same high standards regardless of manufacturer, so designers and specifiers can be assured consistency and quality in their designs. Bimstore is the only content creator and distributor to openly publish its standards for BIM content.

Bimstore is the only content creator and distributor to openly publish its standards for BIM content.

Bimstore believe that it's important that every piece of content on Bimstore is created to the same high standards regardless of manufacturer, so designers and specifiers can be assured consistency and quality in their designs.

The document that all content is checked by is the 'bimstore bible'. This document takes all the current UK standards and good practice guides for BIM content and formats them into a single easy to use document without any contradictions or complex industry acronyms.

Although the document that defines our standards, the ‘bimstore bible’ is freely available for download, I thought I would do a quick overview blog on the various standards that are incorporated into the bible.The main Standard for BIM objects is a British standard called BS8541 and is currently split into 5 parts:

BS8541-1:2012 Part 1 - Identification and classification

This is document is the standard for how BIM objects are identified and goes into classification requirements (Uniclass) and naming conventions. It also goes into the IFC ISO1030 formats for BIM and gives examples of file format and structures such as IFC, XML and COBie.

BS8541-2:2012 Part 2 – Recommended 2D symbols of building elements for use in building information modeling

BS8541 is the British standard for how items/objects should appear on your drawings. For example there is an industry standard for how a valve should look in 2D, or how you show a window opening in elevation. This document also covers hatch, line styles, patterns and symbols. Because the BIM objects are still creating and represented in 2D drawings it's critical that they comply to BS8541-2

BS8541-3:2012 Part 3 – Shape and measurement code of practice

This document goes into the geometric requirements (at quite a basic level) and defines Levels of detail for BIM objects. It defines 3 levels of object by use, Schematic Level, Coordinating Level and Visualization Level.

BS8541-4:2012 Part 4 – Attributes for specification and assessment code of practice

This document goes into the minimum data and attribute requirements for BIM objects for compliance with BS8541. It defines requirements based on 3 types of objects, Template Objects, Generic Objects and Product Objects (what we do at bimstore). This standard is in review at the moment and will become a lot more comprehensive.

BS8541-Part 5/6 – Objects and assemblies

This is a future standard that is currently in consultation. It goes defines what is an assembly objects (an object that is made up of other objects/products, like a curtain wall). Bimstore are on the working group that are helping define and feedback on this standard.

PAS1192:4-Part 4 – COBie

This document defines COBie requirements for Level 2 BIM in the UK. This document is currently in consultation and due to be made public October 2014. Due to BIM.Technologies (bimstores big brother) involvement in various government trail projects we have detailed knowledge of the COBie requirements for BIM content. COBie has also been around for over 10 years in the USA and the requirements and processes that are required are well documented. All Bimstore content is COBie compliant.

AEC(uk) Standard

AEC UK standards unlike British standards go into the software specific details and technicalities of creating objects in the software. There is an AEC UK standard for Autidesk Revit, Graphisoft Archicad and Bently. There are some contradictions between the AEC UK standards and BS standards, although this is getting better and the AEC uk standards are constantly been updated to comply with the BS standards.

For content created in Autodesk Revit format we also now incorporate parts of the 'Autodesk Revit style Guide' where applicable to the UK to ensure content is compatible with Autodesk Seek and 3rd party Autodesk applications.

All Bimstore content is built to a maximum LOD300 with some specialist content built to LOD350. We build into all content 3 levels of Detail which is selectable inside the software LOD 200, LOD300 and LOD350 (where applicable) to ensure the content is usable at all stages of design. We currently use the BIM forum LOD guide to define the level of Development/Detail/Definition as this is the only standard that goes into the detail at component level.

We also make sure that we load all Bimstore content with useful features and feedback mechanisms that help you design and specify more easily.

The bimstore bible is a live document that we are always updating. If you would like to attend one of our free twice yearly workshops to help shape the future of the bible please contact gillian@bimstore.co.uk to book your place.

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